Monthly Archives: November 2015

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In most cases, there is much to gain by working through maintenance strategy optimization. To identify where your company’s maintenance strategy sits on the spectrum, you can perform a simple self-assessment that looks for the most common symptoms, which are described in detail in our guide “5 Symptoms Your Maintenance Strategy Needs Optimizing.” If the symptoms are evident, then there is a strong business case to invest in maintenance strategy optimization. The primary question in diagnosing the health of your maintenance strategy is a simple one. Does your maintenance strategy need optimizing? Ideally, your maintenance strategy is already optimized. Perhaps it was, but is in need of a tune-up. Or, as is the case in many companies, maybe you are experiencing endemic symptoms that lead to: M

  • Recurring problems with equipment.
  • Budget blow-outs from costly fixes to broken equipment.
  • Unplanned downtime that has a flow-on effect on production.
  • Using equipment that is not performing at 100 percent.
  • Risk of safety and environmental incidents.
  • Risk of catastrophic failure and major events.

To identify where your company’s maintenance strategy sits on the spectrum, you can perform a simple self-assessment that looks for the most common symptoms.

  1. Increase in unplanned maintenance – A sure sign that your maintenance strategy is not working is the simple fact that you are performing more unplanned maintenance, which is caused by an increase in the occurrence of breakdowns.
  2.  Rising maintenance costs – In companies that apply best practice maintenance strategy optimization, total maintenance costs are flat or slightly decreasing month-on-month. These optimized strategies combine preventative tasks with various inspection and root cause elimination tasks which in turn produces the lowest cost solution.
  3. Excessive variation in output – A simple definition of the reliability of any process is that it does the same thing every day. In other words, equipment should run at nameplate capacity day in and day out. When it doesn’t, this is an indication that some portion of the maintenance strategy is misaligned and not fully effective.
  4. Strategy sticks to OEM recommendation -Sticking to the maintenance schedule prescribed by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) may seem like a good starting point for new equipment. But it’s only that a starting point. There are many reasons why you should create your own optimized maintenance strategy soon after implementation.
  5. An inconsistent approach – Consistency implies lack of deviation. And this implies standardisation. When it comes to maintenance strategies, standardization is essential.

For an in depth look at these symptoms download the complete guide “5 Symptoms Your Maintenance Strategy Needs Optimizing”