By: Gary Tyne CMRP, CRL

Engineering Manager – ARMS Reliability Europe

Working for a global organization has taken me to some weird and wonderful places around the world. Different cultures, traditions, religions and people certainly enlightens you to the wonderful and colorful place we all call home.

I would say in most of these countries I have at some stage taken a taxi or at least been chauffeured by a driver in a customer’s company vehicle. These experiences have led to some interesting conversations on life, travel, politics, and football with some very knowledgeable and diverse taxi drivers. On the other hand, I have had drivers that have not spoken a word and have just delivered me to my destination in silence, even after trying to engage in conversation, their chosen dialogue is nil speak. bigstock--131191391

A recent taxi encounter occurred when I had just left my customer and was going to call for a taxi, when I spotted someone being dropped off at my current location. I asked the driver if he could take me to Dublin airport and he obliged.

This is when I met Mohammed, an immigrant from Kenya who had moved to Ireland 17 years ago. He was smiling and cheerful and had a generally happy persona about him. We discussed weather in Ireland versus Mombasa, we mentioned football briefly, and then we started to discuss cars. This occurred when a brand new Mercedes went past us in the fast lane and I passed comment on what a beautiful car that was.

Mohammed started to discuss the Toyota Corolla in which we were driving and how he loved his car for its level of reliability. I asked how many miles his vehicle had driven and he pointed out that he had covered over 300,000 miles since he purchased the car brand new in Northern Ireland. He went onto explain how he ensured that it was regularly maintained to a high standard with the best quality oil and original OEM parts being used when any replacements were required. The engine and gearbox were original and providing ‘you look after your car, it will look after you.’ Mohammed was proud of the length of service he had achieved from his vehicle and that the car had never let him down. However, as the vehicle operator he recognized the importance of regular maintenance and the use of the right quality parts. He also said that he only allowed one mechanic to work on his vehicle because he was very skilled and competent at his job and could not trust others to do work on his taxi.

Mohammed was also proud to be a taxi driver in Ireland and combined with his ‘Reliability’ story certainly made the trip to Dublin airport a memorable one. Mohammed did not know my job role and that I had spent over 30 years in Maintenance and Reliability, but he gave me a text book account of what is ‘Reliability’! I said goodbye to Mohammed after he let me take a picture of his mileage and car. I wished him luck and many more years of happy motoring in his reliable Toyota motor vehicle.

Sitting in the departure lounge my trip to the airport and conversation with Mohammed certainly made me think: mileage

  • Do we see this level of passion and ownership amongst today’s industrial operators?
  • Should Operators take more care for their assets, ensuring high reliability through a program of basic care?
  • How do we ensure the right levels of competence in our technicians?
  • How do we ensure that the correct specification and quality of parts are being purchased?
  • How do we ensure that maintenance is being performed at the right frequency on the right asset?

This ‘Reliability Tale from the Taxi’ may have also generated further questions in your own mind, for me, it provided me with  another great ‘Reliability’ story that I can share during one of our global reliability training courses.

 

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