Author: Dan DeGrendel

Optimizing your maintenance strategy doesn’t have to be a huge undertaking. The key is to follow core steps and best practices using a structured approach. If you’re struggling to improve your maintenance strategy — or just want to make sure you’ve checked all the boxes — here’s a 1000-foot view of the process.

1. Sync up

  • Identify key stakeholders from maintenance, engineering, production, and operations — plus the actual hands-on members of your optimization team.
  • Get everybody on board with the process and trained in the steps you’re planning to take.  A mix of short awareness sessions and detailed educations sessions to the right people are vital for success.
  • Make sure you fully understand how your optimized maintenance strategies will be loaded and executed from your Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS)

2. Organize

  • Review/revise the site’s asset hierarchy for accuracy and completeness. Standardize the structure if possible.
  • Gather all relevant information for each piece of equipment.
    • Empirical data sources: CMMS, FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) studies, industry standards, OEM recommended maintenance
    • Qualitative data sources: Team knowledge and past records

3. Prioritize

  • Assign a criticality level for each piece of equipment; align this to any existing risk management framework
  • Consider performing a Pareto analysis to identify equipment causing the most production downtime, highest maintenance costs, etc.
  • Determine the level of analysis to perform on each resulting criticality level

4. Strategize

  • Using the information you’ve gathered, define the failure modes, or apply an existing library template. Determine existing and potential modes for each piece of equipment
  • Assign tasks to mitigate the failure modes.
  • Assign resources to each task (e.g, the time, number of mechanics, tools, spare parts needed, etc.)
  • Compare various options to determine the most cost-effective strategy
  • Bundle selected activities to develop an ideal maintenance task schedule (considering shutdown opportunities). Use standard grouping rules if available.

This is your proposed new maintenance strategy.

5. Re-sync

  • Review the proposed maintenance strategy with the stakeholders you identified above, then get their buy-in and/or feedback (and adjust as needed)

6. Go!

  • Implement the approved maintenance strategy by loading all of the associated tasks into your CMMS — ideally through direct integration with your RCM simulation software, manually, or via Excel sheet loader.

7. Keep getting better

  • Continue to collect information from work orders and other empirical and qualitative data sources.
  • Periodically review maintenance tasks so you can make continual improvements.
  • Monitor equipment maintenance activity for unanticipated defects, new equipment and changing plant conditions. Update your maintenance strategy accordingly.
  • Build a library of maintenance strategies for your equipment.
  • Take what you’ve learned and the strategies and best practices you’ve developed and share them across the entire organization, wherever they are relevant.

Of course, this list provides only a very high-level view of the optimization process.

If you’re looking for support in optimizing your maintenance strategies, or want to understand how to drive ongoing optimization, ARMS Reliability is here to help.

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One Thought on “How to Optimize Your Maintenance Strategy: A 1,000-foot View

  1. Pingback: Top 5 Reasons to Optimize Your Maintenance StrategyARMS Reliability Blog

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