Monthly Archives: February 2018

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Reliability Summit View Available WorkshopsWorld-class maintenance performance requires strong maintenance strategy. But all too often, Leadership within the organization isn’t fulling on board with undertaking an optimization project because they don’t yet see the full value in doing so. And, perhaps, you’re not sure exactly how to convince them that the initiative is worthwhile. 

So, how do you raise awareness within the organization and get support for what you need to do? 

You must build a business case that can overcome the primary objections, illuminate the need and demonstrate the real, tangible value that your project will provide to the organization. 

If you are thinking your organization should invest in doing a maintenance review and optimization, then you’re probably experiencing some of the signs:  

  • High production downtime 
  • Maintenance staff in fire-fighting mode 
  • Some spare parts collecting dust, yet key spares are not available when needed 
  • Maintenance instructions consist of little more than a title or some generic text, e.g., “check and lube as necessary”
  • Very little, if any, information captured on maintenance work orders 
  • Scheduled maintenance tasks generally only created after equipment has failed 
  • Costly equipment failures creating budget overruns 
  • Higher risk of catastrophic failure, equipment damage and major events due to potential (or actual) equipment failures
  • Maintenance KPIs are not in place or are trending towards lower performance
  • Maintenance group isn’t highly valued by the rest of the organization 

To get the buy-in you need, you need to consider points of resistance you might encounter from Maintenance, Production, and Site Management teams. Show them how the signs listed above are causing real problems for your organization, build your business case backed by data, and demonstrate how your initiatives will benefit each stakeholder group.  

Join us at the Reliability Summit, May 8-11, in Austin, Texas to learn in-depth how to build a compelling business case to gain support for your reliability initiatives.  

Attendees will learn: 

  • Potential resistance, fear of change and how the two impact reliability initiatives  
  • Benefits to stakeholders at all levels and how to sell them
  • Necessary steps to build the business case  
  • What analyses and data are required to assess the current state of maintenance and how to use your CMMS to assist   
  • How to explain how each problem affects the business from a maintenance, production, EHS, and business impact  
  • How to develop a project proposal and the key items to be included  
  • What tools to use and how to quantify the additional cost savings to be realized   
  • How to conduct a pilot project and benefits of doing so  

This is one of many workshops attendees can select to attend at the Reliability Summit. For a full list of workshops, please visit our Reliability Summit 2018 website.  

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 Reliability Summit View Available WorkshopsHow do you know if your plant is designed to deliver the target level of productivity?

For many organizations, their answer is “we don’t know.” New capital projects are  typically designed with the main goals of achieving the lowest possible capital outlay for plant and equipment while maintaining the plant’s ability to meet productivity targets. Too often; however, minimizing costs ultimately garners most of the focus in the design phase and as a result plants are handed over to operations teams that simply aren’t designed for reliability. Then the consequences start to appear – High number of failures and breakdowns, no way to achieve better performance from equipment short of a redesign, maintenance costs too high for the plant to be sustainable for the long term.  

To combat this, world-leading organizations are starting to require that a RAMS Analysis (Reliability, Availability, Maintenance, and Safety Analysis) be completed at each project stage. These studies serve as checkpoints with scenario modeling that provides various options to the project team as to how they can meet the business goals of the project at the lowest possible cost. Sophisticated organizations are also incorporating peer reviews to challenge the plant designs and Lifecycle Cost Analysis to evaluate the project over a longer period to predict costs, so they can plan and budget accordingly.  

Case in point… 

Here’s a timeline of how a global mining company built reliability into their design throughout various project stages

  • 2008 – Developed Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) model to validate the design capacity and allow for potential bottlenecks to be understood. Identified that there was a baghouse in the design that could not be isolated and required a complete plant shutdown to perform any maintenance.  Also predicted maintenance budget and labor requirements to understand the maintenance intensive items in the design. Identified multi-million dollar per day single point failure that was addressed in revised re-design that allowed maintenance on baghouse to be completed without plant shutdown.  
  • 2010 – Revised RBD to accommodate some design changes and to validate that the capacity could still be achieved.   
  • 2014 – Revised RBD to accommodate further design changes as project team was challenged to reduce capital cost and increase construction speed. RAM/RBD proved capacity could still be met. Team was challenged to reduce equipment capital by $30M yet keep capacity. Marginal capacity increase resulted and $30M reduction.  
  • 2016 – Revised RBD as more detailed information became available and as further changes were made. Headquarters rubber-stamped project to proceed.  
  • 2017 – Estimate for maintenance build from EPC was 120,000+ man hours. Using ARMS’ libraries, past company models/FMEA’s, and an equipment class strategy approach, we estimate it can take around half of that time and investment to produce maintenance strategies that will help ensure the predicted availability is realized. 

All through the process the mining giant found that the RBD was an essential tool for them when undergoing peer reviews at each project gate.  It was used to confidently assure the board that the capacity targets could be met and that they had a solid foundation on which the budget and resource forecasts were made. 

Join us at the Reliability Summit, May 8-11, in Austin, Texas to learn in-depth best-practices for designing for reliability. This workshop will cover the benefits of designing for reliability and what that process should look like to ensure a sustainable, successful plant is handed over to Operations.  

Attendees will learn: 

  • How to conduct scenario modelling of the plant design and configuration to ensure the plant meets its availability and production requirements at the lowest cost 
  • How to prevent hidden failures and bottlenecks caused by poor plant design 
  • How to develop budget predictions around availability, capacity, labor needs, spares needs, and maintenance costs 
  • How to build maintenance strategies for projects that help ensure the predicted availability is realized 

This is one of many workshops attendees can select to attend at the Reliability Summit. For a full list of workshops, please visit our Reliability Summit 2018 website.

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