Monthly Archives: March 2018

You are browsing the site archives by month.

An often-overlooked element of implementing any new initiative is the process mapping exercise. The more intricate the initiative, the more valuable the process map becomes. Although launching a root cause analysis implementation plan is usually fairly straight-forward, it is still worthwhile spending some time mapping out how the work flows from a triggered event all the way through tracking the effectiveness of implemented solutions. It’s an effective way of ensuring that everyone has a clear understanding of their role and where it fits into the process.

Process mapping is usually done in two-steps commonly known as the brown paper/white paper exercise. The brown paper mapping step creates a diagram representing how RCAs are currently managed throughout the system. Once the existing workflows are clearly understood and charted the white paper charting is performed. This diagram documents the desired workflow and systematically identifies gaps between the current and desired future state. Identifying the nature and magnitude of these gaps allows the Facility Leadership Team and/or RCA Steering Committee to dedicate the resources needed to make the change over.  It also clearly defines the roles and responsibilities of affected departments and positions in the RCA program.

As seen in the example below, different symbols and colors are used to represent various steps and components. The steps are laid out from left to right and top to bottom. A start or stop point is usually designated with an oval or rounded rectangle, a regular step is a rectangle and a decision point is a diamond. All steps are connected by lines and arrows.

Example RCA Process Map- Click to download enlarged PDF

RCA Workflow

When done properly, process mapping leaves no room for misunderstanding of what needs to be done when or voids in roles/responsibilities, resulting in efficient and effective implementation of the RCA initiative and ultimately, operational improvements.

So far, this blog series has covered:

The Key Steps of Designing Your Program

Defining Goals and Current Status

Setting KPIs and Establishing Trigger Thresholds

RCA and Solution Tracking and Roles and Responsibilities

Recommended RCA Team Structure

Responsibilities of the Six Roles

Training Strategy

Oversight and Management

And, Process Mapping.

Stay tuned for our next installments on Change Management and Implementation Tracking.

Corporate and site reliability teams face challenges and pressures to continuously improve and demonstrate the value and business impact they have on their organizations.  The old adage of RCM being a “Resource Consuming Monster” has plagued many a Reliability Department – some organizations have even banned the use of the acronym.

Instead, RCM needs to be viewed as an engineering framework that enables the definition of a complete maintenance regime for maintenance task optimization.

Both puaudit_your_rca_program_im-6a80209eb03aca77b25807e308a01367005abbc6blic and private sector organizations around the world rely on reliability centered maintenance as a means to significantly increase asset performance by delivering value to all stakeholders. Successful implementation of RCM will lead to an increase in cost effectiveness, reliability, machine uptime, and a greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. It can also deliver safer operations, provide a document base for planned maintenance, and predict resource requirements, spares usage, and maintenance budget.

 So, how do you equip your organization for best-practice reliability centered maintenance?

An RCM study determines the optimal maintenance strategy for assets determines by modelling different scenarios and comparing risks and improvements over this lifetime to enable better long-term management of the assets.

At a high level, an RCM Study involves:

Step 1: Developing an FMEA using collected failure data from a variety of sources, such as work order history, spares usage rates, interviews with personnel responsible for maintaining the equipment

Step 2: Combining data with OEM maintenance manuals and spares catalog information to develop a preliminary RCM model

Step 3: Making changes to the preliminary model during facilitation with the staff

Step 4: Validating and optimizing the RCM model by assessing each failure mode by the cost, safety,  environmental and operational contributions to reduce cost and risk

Step 5: Building an maintenance plan that can be uploaded into your CMMS for direct integration of RCM with CMMS

This process will reveal any gaps in the existing maintenance strategy, or conversely deliver peace of mind that existing strategies are working.

Join us at the Reliability Summit, March 26-29, 2019, in Austin, Texas to learn how to manage reliability centered maintenance for your organization.

Attendees will learn: 

  • RCM Skill Building
  • Why Traditional Maintenance cannot meet the needs of business today
  • Weibull Data Analysis
  • What is RCM and how does RCMCost deliver this methodology plus more
  • How to identify failure modes that can impact your plant
  • How to calculate failure data relevant to your equipment using Weibull feature in RCMCost
  • Assessing the total cost impact of failure on a business
  • How Preventive Maintenance and Predictive Maintenance improve business, safety, environment and operational risks
  • Simulating the maintenance strategy in RCMCost
  • RCM Skill Building Continued
  • How to select the optimum maintenance task and frequency
  • Exercises in RCMCost
  • Maintenance Decision making elements and sensitivities

This is one of many workshops attendees can select to attend at the Reliability Summit. For a full list of workshops, please visit our Reliability Summit website.  

 

 

 

Reliability Summit View Available WorkshopsYour company is going through an asset management initiative and they need ‘reliability engineers’ to support this new focus.  One day your title begins with ‘Maintenance _____’ and the next day you come into the office and the title on your door now reads ‘Reliability _____’.  Undertaking new asset management initiatives as a newly titled “reliability engineer” can be daunting.

Reliability Engineering isn’t typically something one would go to school for or get a certificate in, so what does an R.E need to know?

Your “toolkit” as an R.E. should consists of various methods that you can employ with the goal of optimizing maintenance strategies to achieve operational success, including:

  • root cause analysis
  • reliability centered maintenance
  • failure modes and effects analysis
  • failure data analysis
  • reliability block diagrams
  • lifecycle cost calculation

To be successful at increasing the reliability of your plant, reliability practitioners should utilize these ‘tools’ that can deliver the best results, applying them based on the type of problem you’re facing.

Approaching Maintenance Strategy Optimization with Your Toolkit

It’s essential for a newly appointed reliability professional to be aware of common maintenance issues. The more time maintenance personnel spend fighting fires, the more their morale, productivity, and budget erodes. The less effective routine work that is performed, the more equipment uptime and business profitability suffer.

Here’s the good news: An optimized maintenance strategy is simpler and easier to sustain than a non-optimized strategy, resulting in fewer issues and downtime. It’s easy for organizations and new reliability engineers to be intimidated by the idea of maintenance strategy optimization. An important tip to remember is that small changes can make a huge difference. Maintenance optimization doesn’t have to be time-consuming or difficult, nor does it have to be a huge undertaking. By creating a framework for continuous improvement and understanding the methods to employ, you can ultimately drive towards higher reliability, availability and more efficient use of your production equipment.

Join us at the Reliability Summit, May 8-11, in Austin, Texas to learn the essential tools in a Reliability Engineer’s toolkit and how to apply them to achieve operational success.

Attendees will learn: 

  • History of Reliability
  • Introduction to Reliability Concepts
  • Benefits of a Reliability Based Maintenance System
  • Performance Measures
  • Definitions of Terms and Measures in Reliability
  • Introduction to Reliability Engineering Methods
  • Failure Mode and Effects Analysis
  • Failure Data Analysis
  • Reliability Centered Maintenance
  • Maintenance Optimization
  • System Availability Analysis
  • Lifecycle Cost Calculation
  • Problem Reporting
  • What Tool When
  • Key Factors for Success
  • Key Steps in a Reliability Program
  • Summarizing the Business Case for Reliability

This is one of many workshops attendees can select to attend at the Reliability Summit. For a full list of workshops, please visit our Reliability Summit 2018 website.  

blog_footer